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Okay guys, new to the forum. Here is my set up.
I play in a 5 piece band, this is the equipment we are using:
On rear truss
2Chauvet color strips and 2 ADJ Mystic leds
On right truss
2 par 64b pro leds
on left truss
2 par 64 pro leds
1 par 38 pro led
Fog machine under the drum riser
a stage setter 8 is running everything
I am using the stage setter in 1x16 mode
any tips, ideas on how to get a better light show running? I am running this while playing keyboards.
Thanks
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Budget? Isn't that one of those things people with money have? I've heard of them before.
Truthfully, I really don't have a lot of budget right now. I am not using dimmer packs so I thought about those, and maybe a new controller maybe around 3-400.00,but thats about it.I spent a lot in the past 6 months converting from standard to LED lights. I Love the effects I get as it is!
Define better. Do you mean more dynamic, more variety, more 'locked on' to your music? As many have suggested, a more powerful DMX controller is needed. Computer based controllers such as MyDMX will give you the most bang-to-buck, but you would need to have a computer you don't mind bringing to jobs. Since you say you also play in the band, you'll want a controller that doesn't need a designated light tech to run. Possibly consider a controller that can be triggered with your feet.
Good questions Jeff. In my perfect world:
Some good scenes that are tap tempo activated.
the ability to dim lights on all but one performer for a spotlight effect.
Different colors for leads that for backing musicians (bass solo, drum solo etc.)
I am really looking for more hardware based due to the rigors of the road.
I said perfect world.
So more dynamic, possibly more variety, not sure what locked on means, but maybe.
I am pretty set now once I have the tempo locked in, I like the scenes we have, I just want them to be better.
Well, it's hard to say which way to roll. When I've worked on tours, it's consoles, not computers. Consoles tend to not fail, where-as computers can, will and do crap out, mainly these days due to the crappy batch of hard drives infecting the world's computers.

If you want more sync, MyDMX is a good product but not the right product for that application. Compu Live is a better way to go, especially if you're going for an "all in one box" solution: mutli-tracks and sequencing tied to lighting.

Colors are your problem. You gotta do your own lighting design.

Tap tempo? Maybe with a console. Not a good live app unless you're a tiny band trying to run it all from the stage, which is always NOT a wise thing to do anyways.

This is more of a "what is best for your applicatiotn" rather than "What is the absolute best option period" because you ain't got the money for that.(top of the line console with all the bells and whistles... ain't gonna be cheap)
Chris! now you're hurting my feelings.
I am a tiny band and I do run the lights from the stage. In this day and age, I really can't afford to pay a S&L guy. 5 piece bands are hard to book at the prices we need as it is. I do want to do a hardware application, and the DMX operator looks like the way to go for me. My stage setter is d-e-d dead! I just hope I can get it to do as well if not better than the stage setter, I love that little board.
RIP little light board.
First off, suck it up and man up. This is a nasty industry. If you're gonna get yer feelings hurt, it's honestly best to tuck your tail between your legs and exit now. Otherwise, you're gonna be hurt a lot.

Let's look at a few things:
When a band is doing their own sound, there are two major problems, all tied together. You can NOT hear how your mains are interacting with the room. Certain rooms have certain modes and frequency response curves(that can be easily found). Also, since you're mixing FROM the stage, you can't hear what your mix sounds like out there, and NO, it's not the same as your "mains foldback" or headphone mix.

Get an RTA/analyzer, analyze the room. Wow, now you've at least knocked out the room inconsistencies as well as now are able to repeat this at other places. Now, maybe(MAYBE!)what you hear in your cans or foldback is the same as what the audience hears, but I betcha it ain't. Why? Unless you're fully electronic and are using amp simulators, it ain't, because you've got stage wash spilling out into the audience, and so you have to mix to take that into consideration as well, and you simply can't hear that.

The simple task of running an RTA even through the house system(is there one or do you lug you own?) can often greatly improve your overall sound. It's amazing how many house systems are done poorly. An RTA/analyzer can make some amount of headway. It can't do everything but it gives you an extreme advantage.

Then again, perhaps your audience doesn't care that you guys up there sound like ass. But, even so, let's say you're a really good band. Why not help ensure you don't sound like ass by having it done properly? Trust me, you want that and your audience wants that. The club owner would probably prefer it although the reality is he don't give a crap as he just wants asses in seats and drinks sold, which is rather annoying.

Respect yourself, respect your craft, get a sound guy.

Lighting CAN really enhance a show. While you can run it from the stage, it's best to hand that task off too. You really want to be up there as a performer, not a technician. You got better things to do. See if your sound guy will do it for you. He may or may not have a hand free.

I find bands that do their own sound suck at being a band and suck at doing sound. And if you add in lights, that just adds another level of sucking. Why? The musicians are too busy being distracted, or at least one is and that brings the whole thing down.

Doing too much can make even the best bands sound bad. You should be distracted by people trying to rush the stage trying to touch you guys or dodging undergarments being thrown at you. Those are good distractions!

But, you're not going to listen to any of that anyways.

Looking at MyDMX, here's what it can do:
1: It is scene based, but scenes are not static scenes UNLESS you want them to be. Scenes can contain multiple steps, allowing you to do things like movements, or pulsing or whatever you want it to do. Your imagination and willingness to put in an effort are the main restrictions.

2: With the FX generator, you can use MyDMX to quickly make some fairly complicated things with things ranging from color changers to movers and scanners. For example, let's say you have 2 moving yoke fixtures, and you want them to do counter-rotating circles. Wow, honestly, that's a lot of programming all by itself if you had to do it by hand. Nope, just use the 3D Visualizer and enter the FX generator and dial in where you want your circles and tweak your phase and you're done in seconds. It will generate the steps you need to make it happen AND let you safe it for future re-use.

"OK, that's fine, but I want to add wash to the scene"
I'm not going to go into how to do that, but let's say that it's not difficult to do that. Should take you all of 15 seconds once you know the "trick", which isn't difficult either.

"OK, smart guy, I want to re-use what I did but make some little changes"
Same deal. A few things can be done easily. You can copy scenes as much as you want.

3: MIDI control. While MIDI implementation is not the best I've ever seen, MyDMX can support controllers(such as a fader/knob control surface) for controlling DMX channels directly, as well as(and at the same time) MIDI devices for the purpose of triggering scenes. This can range from sequencers to footpedals to keyboards and more. Cool. And since you're planning on a food pedal, here's the thing though, you have to have note on/off control from your foot board to make this happen as scene triggering works off note on events. I know more foot boards work of patch changes, so read your manual.

5: Want to do chases? OK, it can be done via going from scene to scene, but you have to "hard program it" and that COULD be an issue for you, but that is an "It depends how you work" thing. Or you could make a scene with many steps to get your chase. What is better depends on what you want.

6: Sound active. MyDMX is not sound activated. This is a feature you may have grown to need or love, but it's not supported, sorry. Using sound activation to bump from scene to scene won't be allowed.

Enough for now.
jkwheel,
I don't understand how Chris hurt your feelings with his first response? Unless you were joking.

Chris,
Remember we are here to help each other succeed. No use in advising someone with thin skin to tuck his tail between his lets and run, as he may head that advice.

Now fight nice boys. I think that somehow, someone took something the wrong way Confused Confused Confused
Chris, you are right. After 30 years in the industry I should probably tuck my tail between my legs and exit now. Don't worry I have dealt with a-holes my whole life and you seem to be a rank amateur at it.
Firstly I am playing smaller clubs and not venues, so when I run my wireless midi controller or my bass player who runs sound goes out into the crowd we listen and get a feel for the mix.When I play larger venues we do employ a sound guy, but typically for a bar you are right the club owners won't pay for a sound and light team. I never said anything about using the foldbacks or the headphones to determine the mix. We actually lug our own sound system and are constatly told that both our system and our sound are by far better than most of the bands that play in my area. That being said, I believe my question pertained to lighting. Thank you for your advice on mydmx, but as I said before ( maybe you don't read so good). I am looking at hardware not software based applications.
Thank you for your wisdom and sage words.
I am inclined to agree with jingles that your best bet is probably a DMX Operator or 192. The 192 has USB, Audio Input, and a tap sync button over the regular DMX Operator. It also has 240 total scenes and 12 chases vs the 6 and no scenes on the regular.

Scenes will let you set a look and simply hit a button to then bring up that look. Chases will let you chase colors and/or intensities of the fixtures which can then be tap synced via the button on the 192. Midi on the 192 will let you trigger scenes, chases, or blackouts. It likewise still has handles that you are use to on the Stage Setter. Finally, you can control a fog machine with it, though only AMDJ models or DMX controllable models.

All and all, I think you should go with the 192. Will make you life much easier with the ablity to just simply bounce between scenes or bring up a chase and tap sync it. You can get even more in-depth and add Midi control. Not quite sure how involved the RCA input is, but that might be another option as well. So it should work wonderfully for you. It even has room to grow since it can control up to 192 DMX channels in case you want to add say some more LEDs in the future or a strobe, etc. It wouldn't be the best for controlling moving lights however. I would recommend something along the lines of a DMX Operator Pro, a Magic 260, or a Show Designer 1. Its not to say a DMX Operator 192 can't control moving lights, it is just an ease of use factor it all.
I will tell you this though. Don't EVER plug a USB light into the unit the wrong way it will FRY out the whole board. i made that mistake once. and thats why i say i USED to own one haha. It was a rookie mistake back when i was just starting out. i lost ALL my programming and i had almost damn near the whole boards memory full.
There isn't a specific case for the DMX Operator 192. It is rack mountable though, you just have to pull off the sides. On the picture on the website, you can actually see the holes for where the screws go. And check here for what a USB light is. Click on the second picture and it will be shown. Basically, it is an LED light that gets its power off of a USB port.

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